Realms of
Imagination

Albrecht Altdorfer and the expressivity of art around 1500

5 November 2014 to 8 February 2015

In the early sixteenth century, fundamental innovations came about in the art of Europe, which took on a surprisingly modern appearance as a result. The exhibition “Realms of Imagination: Albrecht Altdorfer and the Expressivity of Art around 1500” vividly conveyed how, around 1500, an entire generation of artists formulated the genres of landscape and history painting as well as the portrait anew. Far removed from naturalistic representation, an innovative, expressive interplay of light effects, exuberant colouration and grotesque forms and poses evolved. This development was evident throughout the spectrum of artistic media: painting, sculpture, printmaking, drawing and book illumination. Taking the artists Albrecht Altdorfer (ca. 1480–1538), Wolf Huber (ca. 1485–1553), the Master IP of Passau (active until after 1520) and Hans Leinberger (documented in Landshut, 1510–1530) as a point of departure, the phenomenon of “expressivity” – a chief pursuit of the artists of the so-called Danube School – was here placed in a pan-European context for the first time.

“Realms of Imagination” was the outcome of a joint exhibition project of the Städel Museum and the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung in Frankfurt am Main and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna in cooperation with the Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum Geschichte und Kultur Ostmitteleuropas e.V. of the Universität Leipzig.

CURATORS: Dr Stefan Roller (Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung), Prof Dr Jochen Sander (Städel Museum)
SPONSORED BY: Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain, Sparkassen-Finanzgruppe
WITH ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM: Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne
MEDIA PARTNER: Verkehrsgesellschaft Frankfurt am Main, Weltkunst

After its presentation at the Städel, the show will be on view at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna from 17 March to 14 June 2015.

Webfilm

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